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August 17, 2012, 03:32PM PT in Fitnovatives Blog  |  0 Comments

The Real Benefits of Strengthening Your Core…Beliefs

Your core muscles form the sturdy link in a chain that connects your upper body and your lower body. Regardless of what you do while you’re lifting, twisting or bending – from putting on your gym shoes and socks to taking out the trash – your core is at work. 

confident athlete

Low back pain? Check your core.

Problems playing your favorite sport? Check your core.

Trouble doing household chores? Check your core.

Issues with your posture? Check your core.

A little shaky on your balance and stability? Check your core.

Not thinking clearly or acting wisely? Check your core.

Wait a moment? What does your core have to do with thinking clearly or acting wisely?  Plenty - if it's your core BELIEFS that you're talking about. 

Typically clients know the drill for core exercises, but I'm going to show you additional exercises you may incorporate to add an additional real benefit to your coaching sessions. Have your clients ask themselves (and perhaps ask yourself) this simple question: "What idea have I feverishly and insistently held onto that causes many of the problems in my life?"

Here's a list adapted from the work of Albert Ellis, Ph.D., founder of Rational Emotive Behavior therapy. Known as the forerunner of cognitive behavior therapy, Ellis has compiled a list of the most common irrational thinking that leads to the most universal forms of human upset:

  1. The idea that it is a dire necessity for adults to be loved by significant others for nearly everything they do instead of their concentrating on their own self-respect, and on loving rather than on being loved.
  2. The idea that certain acts are awful or wicked, and that people who perform such acts should be severely damned instead of the idea that certain acts are self-defeating or anti-social and that people's poor behaviors do not make them bad individuals.
  3. The idea that it's horrible when things are not the way we like them to be instead of the idea that it's unfortunate and if it's not possible to change the situation, we should temporarily accept their existence.
  4. The idea that human misery is invariably externally caused and is forced on us by outside people and events instead of the idea that our upset is caused by the view we take of unfortunate conditions.
  5. The idea that if something is or may be dangerous or fearsome we should be terribly upset instead of the idea that we should face it and accept the inevitable.
  6. The idea that it is easier to avoid than to face life's difficulties and self-responsibilities instead of the idea that the so-called "easy way" is usually much harder in the long run.
  7. The idea that we absolutely need something other, stronger or greater than yourself to rely on instead of the idea that it's better to take the risks of thinking and acting independently.
  8. The idea that we should be thoroughly competent, intelligent and achieving in all possible respects instead of the idea that we should accept ourselves as imperfect creatures with general human limitations and specific fallibilities.
  9. The idea that because something once strongly affected our life it should indefinitely affect it instead of the idea that we can learn from our past experiences.
  10. The idea that we must have certain and perfect control over things instead of the idea that the world is full of probability and chance, and despite this we can still enjoy life.

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Help strengthen your own and your client"s core beliefs by answering the following questions in writing:

"What idea have you feverishly and insistently held onto that is the cause of many problems in your life?"

Ask yourself what's inaccurate about this unhelpful thought. Do you have any evidence the useless thought is true? If not, why keep holding onto what's unnecessary? What can you replace this adverse thought with one that's more helpful?

Do this exercise mindfully everyday, one set, as many reps as needed. 

Feel better? Thinking more clearly? Acting more wisely?  Congratulations!

By Michael Mantell
Dr. Michael Mantell

Michael Mantell earned his Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania and his M.S. at Hahnemann Medical College, here he wrote his thesis on obesity. He’s served as the Chief Psychologist of Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego and the Chief Psychologist for the San Diego Police Department. He provides breakthrough strategies to help business leaders, athletes, individuals and families create healthy, fit and happy trajectories in life. He is the Senior Consultant for Behavioral Sciences for ACE, an international behavior science fitness presenter, an Advisor to numerous companies and fitness organizations, on the Sports Medicine team of The Sporting Club of San Diego and is featured in many international media outlets. He is listed in the greatest.com 2013 “The 100 Most Influential People in Health and Fitness.”

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