Core Workout

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Fitness Programs

Workouts & programs

Core Workout

Increase the strength of the muscles that provide stability and mobility for the spine, pelvis, rib cage and hips. Also, improve muscle definition for the superficial core muscles.

WARM-UP

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Cat-Cow

Move slowly through the range-of-motion for 6-10 repetitions; rest 30 seconds, repeat stretch 1-2 more times.

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Supine Pelvic Tilts

Perform 6-12 repetitions, rest for 45-60 seconds; repeat 1-2 more times for a total of 2-3 sets

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Bird-dog

The right-arm/left leg and transition to left-arm/right leg is counted as one repetition, raise arm and leg on a 2-count/hold for 2 counts/lower on a 2-count; perform 8-12 repetitions, rest for 30-45 seconds; repeat 1-2 more times for a total of 2-3 sets.

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Front Plank

Start on the floor, lift up into position, hold for 5-20 seconds (while continuing to breath), slowly lower back to floor, rest for 30-45 seconds; repeat 1-2 more times for a total of 2-3 sets.

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Side Plank with Straight Leg

Start on the floor, lift up into position, hold for 5-20 seconds (while continuing to breath), slowly lower back to floor, rest for 30-45 seconds; repeat 1-2 more times for a total of 2-3 sets. Alternate sides to work both sets of oblique muscles.

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Frequency:

This program could be done two-to-three times per week, with at least one full day of rest between workouts.



Intensity:

There are two different types of muscles that make up the core:    The muscles responsible for stabilizing respond best to isometric exercises held for a period of time or low-intensity (bodyweight) exercises for a higher number of repetitions-12+.   The muscles responsible for providing movement of the trunk respond best to increased loading (resistance) for a fewer number of repetitions—this rep range won’t make the muscles bigger, but will be more effective at stimulating the muscle fibers; for optimal results the muscles should fatigue before twelve repetitions. If you can complete more than 12 repetitions, increase the load or resistance of the exercise. When using heavier resistance for a fewer number of repetitions, the rest period between sets or between circuits should be longer. For example, an exercise with a heavy resistance for 6 repetitions should be followed by a rest interval of 1 ½ to 2 minutes. When starting the program complete each exercise or stretch for 1-3 sets resting between each set before moving to the next exercise. To increase the intensity (burn more calories); turn the routine into a circuit and complete one exercise right after the other and rest for 2-3 minutes after the completion of one circuit (all exercises).

WORKOUT

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Standing Wood Chop

Single dumbbell, medicine ball or weight plates are all options for using a piece of resistance equipment; select a weight that will be challenging.

Perform 6-12 repetitions, if doing 8-12 repetitions—rest for 45-60 seconds, if doing 6-8 repetitions—rest for 1 1/2-to-2 minutes; repeat 1-2 more times for a total of 2-3 sets.

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Standing Cable Rotation

Select a weight that will be challenging; either a piece of resistance tubing (pictured) or a cable machine are options for this exercise. The tubing should be attached to a solid object that will not move; either the tubing or cable should be held at chest/shoulder height.

Perform 6-12 repetitions, if doing 8-12 repetitions—rest for 45-60 seconds, if doing 6-8 repetitions—rest for 1 1/2-to-2 minutes; repeat 1-2 more times for a total of 2-3 sets.

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Seated Medicine Ball Trunk Rotations

Single dumbbell, medicine ball or weight plates are all options for using a piece of resistance equipment; select a weight that will be challenging.

Perform 6-12 repetitions, if doing 8-12 repetitions—rest for 45-60 seconds, if doing 6-8 repetitions—rest for 1 1/2-to-2 minutes; repeat 1-2 more times for a total of 2-3 sets.

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Bent-Knee Sit-up / Crunches

Perform 10-12 repetitions, rest for 45-60 seconds; repeat 1-2 more times for a total of 2-3 sets.

To increase the intensity extend both arms straight over-head—this will increase the length of the body making the muscles do more work.

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Frequency:

This program could be done two-to-three times per week, with at least one full day of rest between workouts.



Intensity:

There are two different types of muscles that make up the core:
    The muscles responsible for stabilizing respond best to isometric exercises held for a period of time or low-intensity (bodyweight) exercises for a higher number of repetitions-12+.

  The muscles responsible for providing movement of the trunk respond best to increased loading (resistance) for a fewer number of repetitions—this rep range won’t make the muscles bigger, but will be more effective at stimulating the muscle fibers; for optimal results the muscles should fatigue before twelve repetitions. If you can complete more than 12 repetitions, increase the load or resistance of the exercise.

When using heavier resistance for a fewer number of repetitions, the rest period between sets or between circuits should be longer. For example, an exercise with a heavy resistance for 6 repetitions should be followed by a rest interval of 1 ½ to 2 minutes.

When starting the program complete each exercise or stretch for 1-3 sets resting between each set before moving to the next exercise. To increase the intensity (burn more calories); turn the routine into a circuit and complete one exercise right after the other and rest for 2-3 minutes after the completion of one circuit (all exercises).

COOLDOWN

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Downward-facing Dog

Hold position for 20-30 seconds, return to a comfortable resting position; rest 30 seconds, repeat stretch 1-2 more times.

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Cat-Cow

Move slowly through the range-of-motion for 6-10 repetitions; rest 30 seconds, repeat stretch 1-2 more times.

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Cobra

Hold position for 20-30 seconds, return to a comfortable resting position; rest 30 seconds, repeat stretch 1-2 more times.

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Frequency:

This program could be done two-to-three times per week, with at least one full day of rest between workouts.



Intensity:

There are two different types of muscles that make up the core:
    The muscles responsible for stabilizing respond best to isometric exercises held for a period of time or low-intensity (bodyweight) exercises for a higher number of repetitions-12+.

  The muscles responsible for providing movement of the trunk respond best to increased loading (resistance) for a fewer number of repetitions—this rep range won’t make the muscles bigger, but will be more effective at stimulating the muscle fibers; for optimal results the muscles should fatigue before twelve repetitions. If you can complete more than 12 repetitions, increase the load or resistance of the exercise.

When using heavier resistance for a fewer number of repetitions, the rest period between sets or between circuits should be longer. For example, an exercise with a heavy resistance for 6 repetitions should be followed by a rest interval of 1 ½ to 2 minutes.

When starting the program complete each exercise or stretch for 1-3 sets resting between each set before moving to the next exercise. To increase the intensity (burn more calories); turn the routine into a circuit and complete one exercise right after the other and rest for 2-3 minutes after the completion of one circuit (all exercises).